Pedagogics as a science of education and doctrines for educating

Author
Landman, W. A., Roos, S. G. and Liebenberg, C. R.

Translation (2011) of chapters one through five (of six) from: Opvoedkunde en opvoedingsleer vir beginners. Stellenbosch: University Publisheers and Booksellers, 1975. Slight edit to Ch one, two, five. 8 March 2014. Ch 3 changed pedagogician to pedagogue in three places on 4 January 2015.
Ch. 3, page 45 slightly edited, April 7, 2016.
CONTENT
Chapter One
AN ESSENCE ANALYSIS OF THE SITUATION OF EDUCATING
W. A. Landman
1.1 Introduction: The fundamental pedagogical structure
1.2 The pedagogical relationship structures
1.2.1 The pedagogical relationship of trust
1.2.2 The pedagogical relationship of understanding (relationship of knowing)
1.2.3 The pedagogical relationship of authority
1.3 The mutual connections among the pedagogical
relationship structures
1.4 Real essences of the pedagogical sequence structures
1.4.1 Introduction
1.4.2 Pedagogical association
1.4.3 Pedagogical encounter
1.4.4 Pedagogical engagment (assuming-responsibility-for-
interfering)
1.4.5 Pedagogical interference
1.4.6 Return to pedagogical association
1.4.7 Periodic breaking away
1.5 The mutual connections among the pedagogical
relationship and sequence structures
1.6 The structure of the pedagogical
Chapter Two
THE EDUCATIVE AIM
W. A. Landman
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Knowledge of aim
2.3 Becoming
2.4 The norm-image of proper adulthood
2.5 In conclusion
Chapter Three
THE CHILD AS A PERSON:
HIS NEED FOR SUPPORT
S. G. Roos
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Relationship structures
3.2.1 Relationship of trust
3.2.2 Relationship of authority
3.2.3 Relationship of understanding
3.3 The pedagogical sequence structures
3.4 The aim structures
3.5 Teaching, forming and educating
Chapter Four
PEDAGOGICAL CATEGORIES AND CRITERIA
S. G. Roos
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Essences of being-in-a-meaningful-world
4.3 Essences of co-existentiality (being-with)
4.4 Essences of temporality
4.5 Essences of being-someone-oneself
4.6 Summary
Chapter Five
THE RELATIONSHIP: PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE AND EDUCATION
C. R. Liebenberg
5.1 What is understood by philosophy of life?
5.1.1 The particularity of a philosophy of life
5.1.2 The demanding character of a philosophy of life
5.1.3 The historicity of a philosophy of life
5.1.4 A philosophy of life is not biologically inherited
5.1.5 Difficulties in perpetuating a philosophy of life
5.1.6 The ideality of a philosophy of life
5.1.7 The meta-scientific character of a philosophy of life
5.2 View of being human, axiology and doctrine for educating as core components of each philosophy of life
5.2.1 Core components in their interconnectedness
5.2.2 A view of being human and a philosophy of life
5.2.3 Doctrine of values and philosophy of life
5.2.4 Doctrine for educating and philosophy of life
5.3 Educative practice as a consequence of a view of being human and of life as found in three cultural communities
5.3.1 Introduction
5.3.2 Philosophy of life and educating in the family
5.3.3 Philosophy of life and educating in the school
5.3.4 Philosophy of life and educating in the church
5.3.5 Concluding view
[NOT YET TRANSLATED AS OF JULY 2011]
Chapter Six
THE CHRISTIAN-PROTESTANT PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE AND DOCTRINE FOR EDUCATING
C. R. Liebenberg
6.1 The Christian-Protestant view of being human and its doctrine of values
6.1.1 The Christian-Protestant view of being human
6.1.2 The Christian doctrine of values
6.2 The Christian view of the aim of educating as spiritual adulthood
6.2.1 Aim-striving with educating as a future-directed activity
6.2.2 Philosophy of life and the aim of educating
6.2.3 The aim of educating
6.3 The task of the school within the framework of the aim of educating
6.3.1 Introduction
6.3.2 The unitary character of the task of educating in the
home and school
6.3.3 Conscience forming as a task of the school
6.3.4 Confrontation with values as a task of the school
6.3.5 Through solitarity to solidarity
6.3.6 Preparation for future vocational practice
6.3.7 The school’s educator
6.4 Pedagogical aspects affecting realizing the Christian and national as philosophy of life moments in educative practice
6.4.1 Introduction
6.4.2 The question of the fundamentals (the form)
6.4.3 The question of the contents (the particulars, the
principles)
6.5 Guidelines by which the Christian and national can be realized in the educative practice
6.6 Teacher preparation and selection
6.6.1 Introduction
6.6.2 The preparation aspect
6.6.3 The selection aspect
6.7 Brief summary of recommendations regarding the ways in which the Christian and national can be realized in the South African practice of teaching
BIBLIOGRAPHY