Orthopedagogic Evaluation

Author: 
Van Niekerk, P. A.

Translation (1999) of Ortopedagogiese diagnostiek. Stennenbosch: University Publishers and Booksellers, 1978. Ch. 16 and biblio edited August 2, 2013. Ch. 12 edited September 14, 2013.

CONTENT*

FOREWORD - PROF. M. C. H. SONNEKUS

CHAPTER 1
KNOWLEDGE OF THE CHILD IN A PROBLEMATIC EDUCATIVE SITUATION IS NECESSARY
1. Introductory orientation
2. The apparent embeddedness of orthopedagogic practice in psychology
3. The orthopedagogic field of work

CHAPTER 2
UNDERSTANDING THE CHILD AS A PERSON
1. Clarification of concepts
2. An attempt to understand a person from a naturalistic point of view
3. An attempt to understand a person from a personological point of view
4. Person-exploratory conversation
5. The orthopedagogic evaluative conversation
5.1 Subjective merging
5.2 Implementing the fundamental pedagogic structures
5.3 Means of conversing
5.4 Disclosing meaning
5.5 Determining the pedagogically attained and attainable

CHAPTER 3
THE ORTHOPEDAGOGIC EVALUATIVE SITUATION
1. Establishing a mutual relationship
2. Entering an educative conversation
3. The fundamental forms of the orthopedagogic evaluative conversation
4. Synthesis

CHAPTER 4
THE PRACTICE OF ORTHOPEDAGOGIC EVALUATION
1. Introduction
2. Pedagogic observation
3. Pedagogic intuition

CHAPTER 5
IMPLEMENTING EXPLORATORY MEDIA
1. Introduction
2. The usefulness of media
3. Implementing media
4. Standardized media
4.1 Intelligence evaluative media
4.2 Media for evaluating personal becoming (development)
4.3 Media for investigating specific aspects of the psychic life
4.4 Scales of values and interest inventories
4.5 Synthesis
5. Individual media
5.1 Performance media
5.2 Media for exploring expressive and projective aims
5.2.1 Projective techniques
5.2.2 Graphic expressive media
5.2.3 Language media
6. Synthesis

CHAPTER 6
THE HISTORICITY CONVERSATION
1. Conceptual clarification
2. Conducting an historicity conversation
2.1 The auto-anamnestic conversation
2.2 The hetero-historicity conversation
2.2.1 The conversational partners
2.2.2 The course of the conversation
2.2.3 The historicity form

CHAPTER 7
PERFORMANCE MEDIA
1. Introduction
2. The "Guide-it"
3. The "Passalong"
4. The Kohs Blocks
5. The "Wiggly Blocks"
6. Form and pattern media
6.1 Form boards
6.2 The tactile-motor media of Werner and Strauss
6.3 The Alabaster board of Strauss and Lethinen
7. Media for evaluating sensory perception
7.1 Visual perception
7.2 Auditory perception
8. Dexterity media
9. Media for evaluating spatial orientation, sense of direction and dominance
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Exploring right- or left-handedness
9.3 Exploring right- or left-eyedness
9.4 Exploring the child's bodily orientation and sense of direction
9.5 Exploring the child's motor skills

CHAPTER 8
EXPRESSIVE AND PROJECTIVE TECHNIQUES
1. Expression as a phenomenon
2. Child drawings
3. The analysis of image elements
3.1 Introduction
3.2 The significance of line use
3.3 The significance of color use
3.4 The significance of surface use
3.5 The significance of giving form
3.6 The significance of spatial representation
3.7 The significance of scheme
3.8 The significance of image
3.9 The significance of repetition
3.10 The significance of composition
3.11 The significance of rhythm
3.12 The significance of contrast
3.13 The significance of standpoint
3.14 The significance of aspect
3.15 The significance of material
3.16 The significance of the use of material
3.17 The significance of experimentation
4. Projection as a phenomenon
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Projection as attribution
4.3 The interpretation of projections

CHAPTER 9
DRAWING A PERSON AS AN EXPLORATORY MEDIUM
1. The implementation
2. Interpretation
2.1 Introduction
2.2 A longitudinal view of characteristics of children's drawings
2.3 Analysis and interpretation

CHAPTER 10
DRAWING A TREE AS AN EXPLORATORY MEDIUM
1. Introduction
2. Implementation
3. Interpreting the drawings
3.1 Orientation
3.2 Observation
3.3 The position of the drawing on the paper
3.4 Size of trees
3.5 The different subparts
3.6 Synthesis

CHAPTER 11
THE WARTEGG DRAWING MEDIUM
1. Introduction
2. Interpretation of the drawings
3. In conclusion

CHAPTER 12
THE RORSCHACH INKBLOT MEDIUM
1. Historical overview
2. The implementation procedure
2.1 Instructions to the child
2.2 Writing down the responses
2.3 Response sheet
2.4 The symbols
2.4.1 Introduction
2.4.2 Location or interpretation
2.4.3 The determinants
2.4.4 The content
2.4.5 Original or popular responses
2.4.6 Number of responses and response time
2.4.7 Particular phenomena
3. The interpretation
3.1 Categorizing the data
3.2 The interpretation
4. A practical example
5. The pedagogic evaluation
6. Appendices

CHAPTER 13
THEMATIC PROJECTIVE MEDIA
1. Introductory orientation
2. Implementing the procedure
3. The Columbus series of Langeveld
4. The Thematic Apperception Test
5. The Four Picture Test of Van Lennep
6. Some pictures from other series

CHAPTER 14
LANGUAGE ANALYSIS
1. Language as a phenomenon
2. Evaluating language
3. Language assignments
4. The Incomplete Sentences medium

CHAPTER 15
EVALUATING INTELLIGENCE
1. Introductory orientation
2. A naturalistic perspective on intelligence
3. Intelligence media
3.1 General
3.2 The New South African Individual Scale (NSAIS)
3.3 Group scales
4. The results of the practice of testing
5. A qualitative analysis of intelligence
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Chorus' qualitative analysis
5.3 Some other contributions
5.4 A qualitative analysis according to Swart
5.5 A qualitative analysis according to Steenkamp
5.6 Synthesis
6. A pedagogic-qualitative analysis of intelligence
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Analysis of actualizing the psychic life
6.2.1 Analysis of emotionality
6.2.2 Analysis of attending
6.2.3 Analysis of intellectuality
6.2.4 Analysis of the educative situation
6.3 The practice of the pedagogic-qualitative evaluation of intelligence
6.3.1 Introduction
6.3.2 The pedagogic-qualitative aspects
6.4 Summary of a pedagogic-qualitative image of intelligence
6.5 A practical example

CHAPTER 16
THE ORTHOPEDAGOGIC EVALUATIVE REPORT
1. The aim is an image of the problematic educative event
2. Organizing the data
2.1 General
2.2 The primary aspects of the report
3. Recommendations
3.1 Interdisciplinary panel discussion
3.2 Planning orthopedagogic assistance
4. The discussion with the educators
5. An example of an orthopedagogic evaluative report

BIBLIOGRAPHY

AttachmentSize
VanNiekerk-Eval_title.pdf17.08 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_foreword.pdf45.76 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_content.pdf77.51 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch3.pdf149.03 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch4.pdf241.71 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch5.pdf252.72 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch6.pdf300.23 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch7.pdf190.97 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch8.pdf329.66 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch9.pdf1.06 MB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch10.pdf2.2 MB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch11.pdf646.27 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch13.pdf377.79 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch14_.pdf141.31 KB
VanNiekerk-Eval_ch15_.pdf768.14 KB
Van_Nie_diag_Ch1(a)pdf.pdf56.58 KB
Van_Nie_diag_Ch2(a)pdf.pdf67.27 KB
Van_Nie_diagn_Ch16.pdf74.89 KB
Van_Nie_diag_biblio.pdf133.05 KB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(a).pdf668.7 KB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(b).pdf984.62 KB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(c).pdf549.31 KB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(d).pdf1.21 MB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(e).pdf734.37 KB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(f).pdf1.18 MB
Van_Nie_diag_ch12(g).pdf1.05 MB